Yesterday, this false tweet was posted. (Ballots have not yet been mailed in CA. This was not a ballot.) The tweet pushed a now ubiquitous false/misleading narrative about mail-in voting, feeding distrust in the election. Here’s how it spread on Twitter: faculty.washington.edu/kstarbi/FalseT… twitter.com/JarrettStepman…
Here’s a snap shot of our graph showing how that tweet spread. Blue circles are retweets. Red diamonds are quotes. Red circles are retweets of quotes. Each shape is sized by the follower count of the retweeting/quoting account. Only accounts > 10,000 followers are plotted.
If you zoom in, you can get a good picture of which accounts drove the early propagation… and how, eventually, most people who saw this tweet (on Twitter) were exposed through corrections (via quote tweets and retweets of quote tweets).
To be clear, I think this case shows corrections working, esp. since this isn’t an isolated case but a pattern of people pushing these false narratives. It’s important to call them out, show how they are wrong, expose the intention behind them, & correct w/ “good" information.
The graph is interactive. You can zoom in & hover over the tweets to see who tweeted, what, when. You can also see the number of followers. Do a box zoom over the first few hours and you can see who helped to catalyze the tweet’s spread (e.g. @Heritage). faculty.washington.edu/kstarbi/FalseT…

Create an account for weekly updates and features such as bookmarks & reading history.